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Croydon Council green light Selective Licensing

RLA
Written by RLA

Croydon Councillors recently announced that proposals for a Borough wide ‘Selective’ Licensing scheme for private landlords will go ahead after an extended consultation period and suggestions that such a scheme could not be implemented after a letter from Housing Minister Brandon Lewis. The Councillors defiantly announce the scheme will go ahead in October of this year…

Croydon Councillors recently announced that proposals for a Borough wide ‘Selective’ Licensing scheme for private landlords will go ahead after an extended consultation period and suggestions that such a scheme could not be implemented after a letter from Housing Minister Brandon Lewis. The Councillors defiantly announce the scheme will go ahead on 1st October of this year.

Minister of State for Housing and Planning for the DCLG wrote a letter to Local Authorities about revisions to Selective Licensing schemes. Under new stipulations, coming into force on 1st April, Local Authorities will not be able to create ‘blanket’ schemes in their constituencies. Read more.

Croydon believe that because they have given Selective Licensing proposals ‘the green light’ that these restrictions will not apply to them. The Selective Licensing scheme will come into force on Thursday 1st October 2015.

Croydon Council also had to extend the consultation period of proposals because of the Enfield case which dictated that Councils are required to engage with local authorities regarding schemes.

For more information, visit the Croydon Council Selective Licensing webpage. Private landlords in Croydon are urged to register early to avoid possible actions.

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RLA

RLA

The Residential Landlords Association (RLA) represents the interests of landlords in the private rented sector (PRS) across England and Wales. With over 23,000 subscribing members, and an additional 16,000 registered guests who engage regularly with the association, we are the leading voice of private landlords. Combined, they manage almost half a million properties.

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  • Selling up as I type. Fed up with being branded a bad landlord with no justification. Wouldn’t mind if councils acted as explemplary landlords when they used to have properties, in days gone by! They can’t even give an indication of the fees, but rumours are rife about ridiculous figures. Wouldn’t mind but usually council sourced tenants cause the most problems, yet we have to be the policeman when they are anti-social

    • For what I’ve seen for the last few yers of property inventories, landlords should always “be the police”. It hasn’t happened that often but I have seen properties damaged beyond the deposit amount, while tenants do get away with it..

  • This will solve nothing except provide unnecessary work for local government workers. We are also selling our property and will reinvest outside of the borough.

  • Yet again the lazy council workers are looking to pass their jobs on to the honest, quality property providing landlords, rather than get out there and properly enforce the laws in place against the bad apples. A lock will only keep an honest person honest, and so goes increased legislation. They are doing this solely to provide further income to their departments through increased ‘taxes,’ rather than offering any sort of quality solution. I provide quality accommodation to good, hard working tenants – places and people I would like to live in and around – that is how I help society. The council just works off the a**-backwards idea that they can continue to raise our costs until we fund everything for them. I say, sack half of them – the ones who don’t do anything anyways, as that is most council staff – and get the other half out there actually enforcing against the bad apples. DO YOUR JOB! Rather than trying to pass everything on to those of us trying to move the world forward. Bad enough we have to carry the dole monkeys, now we have to carry the council monkeys as well!

  • Croydon are acting outside their delegated power and authority by not adhering to the legislation or the directions given to them by the Secretary of State.

    The selective licensing legislation (the clue being selective) was to give local authorities the ability to target localised areas poor accommodation and anti social behaviour.

    It was never intended as a blanket solution and so a cap of 20% of the boroughs geographical area or the number of properties available for private rent in a borough was set for the imposition (where necessary) of selective licensing.

    Above this level the authority were directed to submit their case to the secretary of state for approval.

    Most interestingly a decade ago Croydon also took similar early steps by introducing compulsory HMO registration and after registering many properties they then abandoned it.

    This is just another “Rip Off” like the use of street parking fines.

    It is simple revenue generation and as far as I can tell most private landlords have had enough of the council.

    The council housing stock failures are well documented and it is difficult to understand how the councils have become the gamekeepers

    There must be checks and balances and unless I am mistaken the Housing Associations only grew out of councils failures to maintain and manage housing stock and build new homes.

    The Hosing associations have morphed into developers and their housing management has fallen short.

    What happened to the Decent Homes Standards that were introduced under a Labour manifesto.

    We rented to a RSL for 5 years and had nothing but trouble with poor tenants and ASB and the properties were handed back damaged and in poor condition

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