Wales

Enforcement key to protecting tenants say landlords, not more regulation

RLA
Written by RLA

Speaking as the Welsh Government launches its ‘Rent Smart Wales’ initiative, Douglas Haig, Vice Chairman for the Residential Landlords Association (RLA) in Wales said: “Whilst we encourage all landlords to comply with the new regulations and follow the Welsh Government’s guidance, the RLA believes that this will detract local authorities’ attention away from tackling the minority of landlords who are criminals and stretch resources further…

Speaking as the Welsh Government launches its ‘Rent Smart Wales’ initiative, Douglas Haig, Vice Chairman for the Residential Landlords Association (RLA) in Wales said:

“Whilst we encourage all landlords to comply with the new regulations and follow the Welsh Government’s guidance, the RLA believes that this will detract local authorities’ attention away from tackling the minority of landlords who are criminals and stretch resources further.

“We believe that existing regulations in the private rented sector are sufficient to tackle the criminal landlords, however we do not see adequate enforcement of the powers that already exist.

“A better deal for tenants would be to put the resources used to create the scheme into enforcement instead.”

The Welsh Government has yet to confirm when a landlord will be able to start registering under the scheme, preparing for training, applying for a licence, or the cost of licensing, although the RLA expects that this will be from £200 per managing landlord.

Further Information
  • The Welsh Minister for Communities and Tackling Poverty, Lesley Griffiths AM will today unveil “Rent Smart Wales”, the brand for the new landlord and agent registration and licensing scheme which comes into effect this autumn.

 

About the author

RLA

RLA

The Residential Landlords Association (RLA) represents the interests of landlords in the private rented sector (PRS) across England and Wales. With over 23,000 subscribing members, and an additional 16,000 registered guests who engage regularly with the association, we are the leading voice of private landlords. Combined, they manage almost half a million properties.

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  • This legislation seems incredibly poorly thought through. My father, is nearing 80 years of age, disabled and is an ‘accidental landlord’ having being unable to sell our family home for a reasonable price following the death of my mother and moving to a small property. Leaving his old house empty meant he was incurring bills which were eroding his pension income and he decided to rent it out. The property is rented via a fully managed letting agent who look after all maintenance and he has all other admin e.g. tax done for him by family. He is partially deaf and having worked in a ‘hands-on’ semi-skilled role prior to retirement finds paperwork difficult. In no way, however, is he not a “fit and proper” person under the meaning of the legislation.

    As I understand it, this disabled pensioner now has to successfully attend and undergo a training course, which he would find hugely stressful, to become accredited (even though his agent will also need to be licensed) and carry out Continuing Professional Development for re-accreditation. It’s more likely he will stop renting and/or be forced to sell his main asset at a time when housing prices in his area remain very depressed. He won’t be the only person (landlord or tenants) who is ‘collateral damage’ in this legislation.

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