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Evictions Legislation will do little to tackle criminal landlords says Shelter Wales

RLA
Written by RLA

Shelter and the Citizens Advice Bureau in Wales have previously warned that legislation on retaliatory evictions would increase rents and do little to tackle illegal activity by criminal landlords…

Shelter and the Citizens Advice Bureau in Wales have previously warned that legislation on retaliatory evictions would increase rents and do little to tackle illegal activity by criminal landlords.

With the House of Lords due to vote on legislation to ban retaliatory evictions on 11th February, this appears to undermine support for this from various organisations, including Shelter.

The  assessment is contained in a document entitled “Making rights real – Preventing retaliatory evictions in Wales” published in July 2013 by Shelter Wales, working with Citizens Advice Bureau Wales.

The report notes that such a measure could lead to rent rises. Page 5 reads:

“In reality the transition to protecting tenants from retaliatory action may need to be managed in a way that gives landlords time to raise investment and minimises the likelihood of extreme rent rises.”

Legislation is not likely to address the problem of the criminal landlords. Page 6 reads:

“There is a risk that introducing protection from retaliatory eviction may encourage rogue landlords to resort to illegal eviction methods such as harassment or withdrawal of services. This is why it is critical that local authorities have the resources to carry out enforcement.”

Commenting on this, Alan Ward, Chairman of the Residential Landlords Association said:

“The RLA is totally opposed to retaliatory evictions, and there is already plenty of legislation in place to prevent them. Improvements to processes can be made and we have suggested these, but further legislation may end up damaging tenants’ interests as this document says.”

 

 

About the author

RLA

RLA

The Residential Landlords Association (RLA) represents the interests of landlords in the private rented sector (PRS) across England and Wales. With over 23,000 subscribing members, and an additional 16,000 registered guests who engage regularly with the association, we are the leading voice of private landlords. Combined, they manage almost half a million properties.

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