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Immigration Bill 2015 / 2016 published

RLA
Written by RLA

The Government has published the Immigration Bill 2015 / 2016.This Bill carries with it a number of implications for Landlords. The Bill is intended to clamp down on illegal immigration, tackle the exploitation of low skilled workers and sanctioning those that enable exploitation. Landlords checking the immigration status of potential tenants is being seen as a way to reduce exploitation of immigrants; especially those travelling illegally, by not allowing migrants to rent their property without the appropriate documentation…

The Government has published the Immigration Bill 2015 / 2016.This Bill carries with it a number of implications for Landlords. The Bill is intended to clamp down on illegal immigration, tackle the exploitation of low skilled workers and sanctioning those that enable exploitation. Landlords checking the immigration status of potential tenants is being seen as a way to reduce exploitation of immigrants; especially those travelling illegally, by not allowing migrants to rent their property without the appropriate documentation.

You can read the bill in full here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/immigration-bill-2015-16

To read the Bill and Explanatory notes click here

Of particular importance to Landlords,

  • Those who fail to check the immigration status of tenants could be fined or imprisoned for up to five years under a new criminal offence included in a new immigration bill.
  • The Bill introduces new powers to evict tenants who lose the right to live in the UK without a court order. Under the proposals for landlords in England, the Home Office would issue a notice when an asylum application fails that confirms the tenant no longer has the right to rent property. There is a specified notice of 28 days and this notice is to be treated as a notice to quit. This notice will be seen as enforceable as if it were an order of the High Court. You can find out more in the Bill and Explanatory notes here.

The ‘Right to Rent’ scheme brought in under the Immigration Act in 2014 has been piloted in the West Midlands since October 2014 and is currently being evaluated by Government.  The Government has pledged to publish its evaluation of the right-to-rent pilot ‘in due course.’

The RLA has been working alongside other industry experts to represent the interest of Landlords as the Government consider expanding the scheme nationally.

The next reading of the Bill is expected to be debated in Parliament in October 2015. We will keep you up to date with progress of this Bill as it happens. We are also currently devising guidelines to go on the RLA website.

To read the Bill and Explanatory notes click here.

Further Information

About the author

RLA

RLA

The Residential Landlords Association (RLA) represents the interests of landlords in the private rented sector (PRS) across England and Wales. With over 23,000 subscribing members, and an additional 16,000 registered guests who engage regularly with the association, we are the leading voice of private landlords. Combined, they manage almost half a million properties.

6 Comments

  • This legislation will create serious problems with Squatters and informal settlements developing around the country. People should have the basic human right to accommodation, the land lord should be able to notify the government if the tennant is a suspected illegal immigrant, and the government should then take action to send them back to their country of origin, but removing the right to have accommodation will result in many serious implications. This is a very poorly thought out piece of legislation.

    • This legislation is the first step in halting illegal immigration which this country can not support. Immigration is creating a poor mans land for the rest of us and can not continue.
      Any step to stop this influx in to Britain is welcome.

      We are giving accommodation to immigrants but not to British people already homeless, this can not be right

  • This is placing an unfair burden on landlords and agents. The amount of regulation has already increased to the stage that the time spent on administration far outweighs anything else.

  • A derisory and disgusting attempt to transfer the failings of the immigration service to the private sector. By making huge cutbacks the state is unable to properly administer immigration. I for one will have nothing to do with it.

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