Uncategorized

Landlords welcome new safety measures for PRS

RLA
Written by RLA

New measures to require smoke and carbon monoxide alarms to be installed in homes to rent are being welcomed by landlords. The move comes after calls for such a policy in the Residential Landlords Association’s manifesto for the private rented sector (PRS)….

New measures to require smoke and carbon monoxide alarms to be installed in homes to rent are being welcomed by landlords. The move comes after calls for such a policy in the Residential Landlords Association’s manifesto for the private rented sector (PRS).

In response to a consultation on property conditions in the sector, Housing Minister, Brandon Lewis MP, has today announced that from October 2015 all private rented sector homes will require a working smoke alarm on every floor of the property.

The measures will also mean that landlords would need to install carbon monoxide alarms where there is considered to be a higher risk, such as rooms with a solid fuel heating system.

Ministers have also pledged extra funding for fire and rescue authorities to offer free smoke and carbon monoxide alarms to local landlords.

Commenting on the development, Alan Ward, Chairman of the Residential Landlords Association said:

“The RLA has long called for a safe, legal and secure private rented sector. Today’s announcement plays a major part in meeting this goal.

“This is a policy that we campaigned hard for, and was a key part of the RLA’s manifesto for the private rented sector.

“Proposals for funding to provide free alarms to landlords are particularly welcome and I look forward to seeing the details of this.”

Further Information

About the author

RLA

RLA

The Residential Landlords Association (RLA) represents the interests of landlords in the private rented sector (PRS) across England and Wales. With over 23,000 subscribing members, and an additional 16,000 registered guests who engage regularly with the association, we are the leading voice of private landlords. Combined, they manage almost half a million properties.

8 Comments

  • All our rented properties have mains operated interconnected heat, smoke and carbon monoxide alarms. It fine to have the protection but if they are not interconnected, one will not hear them specially at night time when they are sleeping.

  • Who can argue with installing two alarms at £5 each. It’s the decent and responsible thing to do anyway.
    I would like to see gas safety checks relaxed to a risk based approach providing working co alarms are appropriately installed.

  • I am glad they are making this a requirement and i hope they do make the equipment free or low cost to Landlords.
    I have just spent £1000 putting hard wired alarms in all my properties which works out less than £50 a property which is not that expensive for piece of mind. The alarms fit directly to the light fitting so no excess wiring or decorating.
    I have always had battery smoke alarms in varying amounts in each property, but on the latest rounds of inspections we found an amount not working (we even issue new batteries for a £1) due to batteries not being replaced or taken out due to bleeping (i thought that is what they are meant to do).
    My theory is if there was a fire could i guarantee everybody would get out, and the cost of sorting out the mess caused would cost a lot more than a £1000.

  • In response to your question Kathy – it depends. I’m pretty sure that the legislation will allow for the inexpensive battery operated alarms (available from most DIY stores) to be fitted. But f your property has been designated as a mandatory HMO or is within an area covered by a Selective Licensing Scheme, your licence will no doubt require you to install hard-wired inter-connected heat/smoke alarms. In either case, for the reasons given by AB, I would recommend the hard-wired option.

  • Regular battery smoke alarms will not be enough. They will have to be hard-wired alarms to comply with the new rules as the Landlord will have a legal duty to test them every month. To get over this, a hard-wired alarm is required.

  • Carbon monoxide alarms are inexpensive and should surely be in all properties? Why not? I have just installed a 7 year one in addition to a small, nornal bettery one. £30. Could save my tenants’ lives.

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.