Local Government Regulation and Enforcement

Nottingham’s landlord licensing plan gets green light

nottingham
Sally Walmsley
Written by Sally Walmsley

Controversial plans to introduce landlord licensing across swathes of Nottingham have been given the go-ahead – and are now being sent to the Secretary of State for approval.

The council’s executive board voted unanimously to approve the selective licensing scheme, which will see landlords pay up to £655 per home.

The scheme, as proposed initially, would have covered the whole of the city, but has since been amended to exclude some areas, meaning 3,700 properties will be exempt.

The council has also increased the incentive for landlords to become accredited. Initially the lower licensing fee was £460 per property, a figure which has been further reduced to £400 – an extra 13% off.

Licences will last for five years.

Councillor Jane Urquhart, the city council’s portfolio holder for planning, housing and heritage, said: “We have listened carefully to the issues raised in the consultation and made changes to the proposed scheme without losing focus on the improvements it sets to achieve in the overall standard of private rented housing in the city.

“Reducing the cost of the licence for landlords who have accreditation creates even more of an incentive for landlords to obtain it to demonstrate that they meet the required standards so we would encourage them to make an application.”

All licensing schemes which cover more that 20% of PRS properties or 20% of the geographic area of a town or city have to be approved by central government.

If it gets the go-ahead it will be introduced in the April next year.

The RLA is opposed to licensing, believing it merely punishes good landlords who pay for the licences, while the criminals continue to operate under the radar.

However, it welcomes the fact that the city council recognises the value of accreditation.

The RLA is holding a Principles of Letting course in Nottingham on August 9th.

For information and to book click here.

For more information about licensing in Nottingham visit our Local Authority Network pages here.

For more information:

About the author

Sally Walmsley

Sally Walmsley

Sally Walmsley is the Communications Manager for the RLA and award-winning Editor of RPI magazine. With 16 years’ experience writing for regional and national newspapers and magazines she is responsible for producing articles for our Campaigns and News Centre, the weekly E-News newsletter and editorial content for our media partners.

She issues press releases promoting the work of the RLA and its policies and campaigns to the regional and national media and works alongside the marketing team on the association’s social media channels to build support for the RLA and its work.

3 Comments

  • With the threat of a Labour government within a few years or even imminently, I would have thought licensing was the last thing landlords would want to worry about as future Labour housing policies would pose a very serious to the viability of buy to let and perhaps even threaten the ability of the landlord to serve a section 21 notice without massive obstacles. Many landlords are just hanging on for the market to improve under this Conservative government before getting out for good.

    • Perhaps you should consider the unscrupulous landlords who are in buy to let and are letting substandard properties for excessive rents. Then should the tenant request repairs or improvements are threatened with eviction. I have sons that were at university in Bristol and Nottingham and some of the properties to rent are a disgrace. I appreciate that landlords have made an investment and need to make a profit but many are very greedy with little thought of the human cost. Ask your self would I be prepared to live in this house I am renting out?

  • Though we were aware of this from long, just sharing our thoughts here. Most of the landlords are not even aware of the legal factors involved in renting a property. This kind of information shared here is really helpful and informative. Thank you for sharing. Will be bookmarking this and sharing it with our landlord clients for easy access to the information.

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.