Region South East

Selective licensing to be introduced in Brighton and Hove

brighton
Victoria Barker
Written by Victoria Barker

Brighton and Hove council has approved the introduction of selective licensing in twelve wards of the town.

The new selective licensing scheme will mean that landlords who have properties in many  wards of the city will now have to pay for a licence, in order to rent out their property lawfully.

The areas that will be affected by  the new scheme include:  Brunswick and Adelaide, Central Hove, East Brighton, Hanover & Elm Grove, Hollingdean & Stanmer, Queens Park, Moulsecoomb & Bevendean, Preston Park, Regency, South Portslade, St Peters & North Laine and Westbourne.

The Secretary of State has confirmed that the designation shall come into force on 4 February 2019, and unless revoked beforehand, it will remain in force for a period of five years.

You can read the official notice from Brighton and Hove Council here

When the council launched a consultation on the plans, the RLA formally responded to it, by saying that There is little evidence that licensing schemes improve housing standards. The focus of staff
becomes the processing and issue of licences, while prosecutions centre on whether a
property is licensed or not, rather than improving management standards and property
conditions.

The RLA is opposed to Selective Licensing in general, because it believes that good, law abiding landlords are made to pay up for often expensive licences, while the criminal landlords do not pay for a licence and continue to operate ‘below the radar’.

In June, the Government announced that it would be launching a review into Selective Licensing, the results of which look set to be published in Spring.

Find out more

About the author

Victoria Barker

Victoria Barker

Victoria is the Communications Officer for the RLA.

She is responsible for producing articles for our Campaigns and News Centre, the weekly E-News newsletter and media review, and creating social media content. She also contributes to our members magazine, Residential Property Investor.

2 Comments

  • That’s exactly what happens:
    There is little evidence that licensing schemes improve housing standards. The focus of staff
    becomes the processing and issue of licences, while prosecutions centre on whether a
    property is licensed or not, rather than improving management standards and property
    conditions.

    Us good landlords & good tenants get nothing in Nottingham for our £780.
    We just get worse houses as the funds have now gone on Licenses.
    And tenants have had to have rent increases to cover it.

  • I agree. I rent, and I am not going to tell my landlady about the scheme ( I don’t think she will find out otherwise – how will she? I pay the council tax? ) because what is to stop her from either increasing my rent to cover her costs, or even worse, maybe she will just sell up. Now, conversely, I rent a property in Bootle and I pay a license fee there (the tenant is on housing benefit so the council know who I am and duly sent me a letter informing me). I have very little money in this house account and now I have even less because I had to fork out £700. I am seriously considering selling now. Who is this helping? My tenant was happy, I was happy…… this should only be targeted at landlords who own a little property empire and have HMOs. Not Joe Bloggs who rents out 1 house.

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