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Smoke Alarms & Carbon Monoxide guides and webpage live

RLA
Written by RLA

New regulations in the Energy Act 2013 will require smoke alarms and in certain circumstances Carbon Monoxide (CO) alarms to be installed in rented residential accommodation. To prepare for this the RLA has produced a series of guides to help landlords understand their responsibilities, and a webpage to help contact your local Fire & Rescue service for more details…

New regulations in the Energy Act 2013 will require smoke alarms and in certain circumstances Carbon Monoxide (CO) alarms to be installed in rented residential accommodation in England. To prepare for this the RLA has produced a series of guides to help landlords understand their responsibilities, and a webpage to help contact your local Fire & Rescue service for more details.

The RLA has created a series of three guides to help landlords understand their responsibilities as failure to comply can lead to a civil penalty being imposed of up to £5,000. The regulations apply to both houses and flats.

Carbon Monoxide and Smoke Detectors requirements from 1st October 2015 – RLA Guide

RLA guide to Carbon Monoxide detectors

Simple guide to Carbon Monoxide

The RLA has also created a webpage with information about local Fire & Rescue authorities, so that landlords can get information quickly and easily regarding availability of Smoke Alarms and CO detectors, and potential safety assessments for privately rented properties.

Read more – DCLG funds fire safety

You can also visit the #Alarms4Life webpage which is the Government scheme

UPDATE: September 7th 2015

Please note: although Government has not approved proposals this guidance is likely to keep landlords compliant. We will inform readers when we have received confirmation on requirements.

The DCLG has published two guides regarding the Smoke and Carbon Monoxide Alarm (England) Regulations 2015.

Q&A Booklet for the Private Rented Sector – landlords and tenants

Explanatory Booklet for Local Authorities

  • This guide provides local authorities the information required to enforce the laws that are likely to be approved by Government.
    • Enforcement authorities (local authorities) are required to issue a remedial notice where they have reasonable grounds to believe a landlord has not complied with one or more of the requirements.
  • Click here to view the explanatory booklet for local authorities

Landlords will rightly gravitate towards the booklet designed for them; however, the local authority guidance could be of use because of the Enforcement Process that is laid out in the second document.

Either way, there is no excuse for non-compliance and landlords face heavy sanctions for failing to adhere to legislation.

About the author

RLA

RLA

The Residential Landlords Association (RLA) represents the interests of landlords in the private rented sector (PRS) across England and Wales. With over 23,000 subscribing members, and an additional 16,000 registered guests who engage regularly with the association, we are the leading voice of private landlords. Combined, they manage almost half a million properties.

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  • I recentlyvisited the Bristol headquarters of Avon Fire & Rescue Services, who were giving out free smoke and CO2 alarms to landlords.
    I specifically asked the fire officer in charge of the excersise if I needed Co2 alarms in my rented flats which had gas boilers and hobs, but no solid fuel fires.
    He confirmed that I didnt, and only properties which had solid fuel (coal,wood,gas etc) burning fires required Co2 alarms to be fitted, under the new regulations.
    This information seems to be contradicting other statements I’ve read on various websites?
    Does anyone have a definitive definition of exactly when Co2 alarms should be fitted, and whether this includes properties without solid fuel burning fires, even although they have gas boilers and hobs?

    • They’re not CO2 alarms, which is carbon dioxide, they’re CO alarms – carbon monoxide. They are required in rooms with solid fuel burning appliances, presumably because gas burning appliances are already covered (or should be) by the annual gas safety check.

  • I have both Fire and Smoke alarms fitted to my properties and for the last 5/6 years have had them checked by an Authorised Fire Safety Engineer every six months at a cost of £1100 per annum, but have now been told by fellow Landlords that I am not required to do this as a Legal Obligation. What is the Legal Requirement on this matter, there seems to be no clear advice available.
    Many Thanks,
    Frank Breen.

  • Are battery operated (long-life 10 year battery type) smoke alarms acceptable under the new regulations?

    Does anyone definitely know the correct answer to this question?

  • I recently read that 24% of new CO detectors out of the box do not work properly so need to be checked with a special aerosol can of gas. Pushing the check button only checks the electronics, not the actual gas detector unit. Gas Safe have been pushing for CO monitors for many years and I intend to contact them to request that CO testing is added to the annual boiler and appliances check form. If the cost was kept low then I reckon most landlords would accept this and it would take the burden from landlords. After all Gas Safe engineers should know more about CO.

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