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Social sector rents increase by six times more than private sector

RLA
Written by RLA

New analysis by the Residential Landlords’ Association has revealed that rents in local authority controlled homes have increased six times more than in the private sector over the past eight years…

Figures burst the myth that private rents are spiralling out of control.

New analysis by the Residential Landlords’ Association has revealed that rents in local authority controlled homes have increased six times more than in the private sector over the past eight years.

Figures published by the Department for Communities and Local Government show that in the eight year period between 2005/06 and 2012/13, local authority housing average weekly rents in England increased from £55.27 to £78.78, an increase of 42.5 per cent.

By contrast, figures from the Office for National Statistics have shown that in the eight years between August 2005 and August 2013, rents in the private rented sector in England increased by just 7.2 per cent. This compares with an RPI increase of 30.3 per cent over the same period, meaning that private sector rents actually fell in real terms.

Commenting on the findings, Alan Ward, chairman of the RLA said: “These figures burst the myth that it is private sector rents that are spiralling out of control, when it is tenants in local authority controlled housing who are facing far steeper increases in rents.”

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RLA

RLA

The Residential Landlords Association (RLA) represents the interests of landlords in the private rented sector (PRS) across England and Wales. With over 23,000 subscribing members, and an additional 16,000 registered guests who engage regularly with the association, we are the leading voice of private landlords. Combined, they manage almost half a million properties.

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  • I am interested to find out as to if anyone else in other areas of the country, our agency being in Greenwich/Bexley Boroughs, are experiencing a high level of tenant rent arrears. We have always had some people not paying rent or late payers but it seems that we now have regular non payers and tenants who are appear to be serial rent arrear tenants and very often know the system and how to play it. There is a lot of legislation that protects tenants but nothing that protects landlords from generally ‘bad’ tenants. What do other people think about a bad tenant register that would only apply if tenants are evicted for non rent payment??
    Having been in the business for 13 years arrears are definitely on the increase and not just because of the bedroom tax these are tenants who work full time and ‘choose’ not to pay rent

  • In Australia this tenant list ( of defaulters) is the normal practice. In Scotland the whole practice is put on its head with a landlord register ( where the landlord is penalised for the behaviour of his tenants !!!!). The vast majority of tenants are good and honest, there should be no general disquiet about non paying tenants being registered for non payment, in exactly the same way where landlords could be registered for similar issues relating their general responsibilities such as non payment of deposits. Etc.. What is good for one party to the business should be balanced by similar arrangements for the other party.

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